The Course of Empire

Thomas Cole (1801-1848) was an English-born painter who emigrated to the United States as a teenager.  He painted a series of paintings called “The Course of Empire” and put out the first of five in 1834.  Cole took out newspaper ads for the series, and quoted a verse from Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage that summarizes its theme nicely:

There is the moral of all human tales;

‘Tis but the same rehearsal of the past.
First freedom and then Glory – when that fails,
Wealth, vice, corruption – barbarism at last.
And History, with all her volumes vast,
Hath but one page…

The paintings depict the rise and fall of some great civilization, depicted as a city along a river.  Throughout the five paintings you’ll notice the big boulder in the background, and the paintings are along different aspects of the river but the boulder remains in all of them.  Some see Greece, others Roman, and yet others the American Empire.  The series depicts the vicious cycle and serves as a strong visual warning of what may be ahead if we are not careful, if we can even control it at all.

The series begins with The Savage State.  There is very little going on; it is the great wilderness.  The frontier.  Pioneer life.  Some think Cole here is depicting Native American life.  He was known for his landscape paintings and surely was inspired by the American wilderness, having lived in Ohio.  The painting is largely dominated by nature, with man but a small piece of it.

The second painting in the series is The Arcadian or Pastoral State.  Things have built up a little bit.  This one probably resembles Greece the most.  Nature is still very much dominant here, but with some impressive structures constructed as well.  Notice the temple for worship with smoke billowing out of it from some sacrifice.  I highly suggest clicking on the links from the captions for a bigger version of each painting because there’s a lot of detail.  There are a lot more activities going on in this painting, even including a man sketching some apparent geometric problem or perhaps sketching a structure to build.  Things are beginning to develop.

The Consummation of Empire is the third painting in the series and represents the height of the empire.  A massive change has taken place, but notice we are looking at the same area with our boulder as our marker, albeit from a different viewpoint.  This is surely inspired by the Roman Empire at its height.  The sky is sunny and bright, temples and marble structures abound, the entire painting is bustling with activity and commerce, and technologically things have progressed quite a bit as well given the fountains, buildings, and vehicles.  There are ornate decorations everywhere, and there appears to be some kind of party or celebration going on.  Some think the ornate detail and overall decadence of the painting foreshadows the impending doom.  At this point nature has clearly taken a back seat to civilization with very little harmony, only dominance.

Destruction.  A similar viewpoint as the previous painting but pulled out a bit more.  Death and destruction.  The city is being sacked, warships are everywhere and the city has been set ablaze.  Some think the scene is inspired by the Vandal sack of Rome in 455.  The statue in particular stands out.  He seems to be plodding forward, but with the decapitated head perhaps suggesting an uncertain future.  Clearly this is the downfall of the civilization.  How it got there can be speculated on, or left to the imagination of the viewer.

The last piece is entitled Desolation.  A significant time has passed.  All we see are some remains of what was the once great Empire.  Nature has begun to work Her magic.

 

The collection as a whole is fantastic and really gives one pause.  Apply it to past civilizations or ours today, but learn from it.  I often wonder where we are in this cycle, or whether the cycle must inevitably end up the same way every time.  Perhaps we peaked in the 1950s, or with the moon landing.  Or perhaps we’re still ascending but with a few more bumps, trials, and tribulations along the way.  Either way, appreciate the time we are in, learn from the past, and do what we can to preserve and build up our great civilization for future generations.

Puppets

Either they’re passing around the same crappy joke, or the Cabal has forced them to deliver the same crappy joke.  It doesn’t look good either way.

Now, we know these are no-talent hacks.  They’ve always been no-talent hacks.  But this feels to me like it’s the latter, and the joke has been written in to all their routines to further an agenda.  It’s not reading into things too much to say that these late night comics are used to push a narrative.  That much is obvious at this point.  They’ve all sold their souls for money and fame and now must do the bidding of their masters.  Comedy has taken a turn for the worst ever since the buildup to the election.  And now we’re continually force-fed Amy Schumer and beaten over the head being told that she’s funny.  Political correctness has ruined any semblance of mainstream comedy.  But, there are still some talented people out there.  Give the poster of the video a shot, Owen Benjamin.  He’s great.

Handel: Zadok the Priest

A little music for your weekend listening pleasure.  German composer (later a naturalized subject of Britain) George Frederick Handel composed Zadok the Priest for the coronation of King George II in 1727.  It has been sung before the coronation of every British monarch since then.  Great Britain has changed much since then, unfortunately trending downwards for the last 50+ years.  It could do them a lot of good to look inward to their own past and get some semblance of pride and gratitude for what their ancestors did to build up their great nation, which they are so wastefully throwing away now.

 

Eroica

Referencing Napoleon in my last post inspired me to post Beethoven’s 3rd Symphony.  Rumored to be originally dedicated to Napoleon until he made himself emperor, it is a titan of a work and a crowning achievement of Western culture.  Here’s Leonard Bernstein conducting the New York Philharmonic, and for a great little additional feature also linked to a breakdown of this with Bernstein explaining in more detail.  Truly a great listen.

 

Netflix showing film that contains child pornography

Normies will look at you sideways if you suggest that the feral left and deep state cabal are trying to normalize pedophilia.  They’ll call you extreme if you think the transgender bathroom thing went too far.  You give an inch, and they want your entire arm.  It will never be enough.

In the latest example of normalization, Netflix has released a film depicting child pornography.  Via Fox News:

Netflix has come under fire for a movie streaming on their site that some viewers say contains a scene that is child pornography.

The opening scene of the Argentinian film “Desire” depicts two young girls under the age of 10 playing around with pillows. The scene takes a sexual turn involving one of the girls.

The news site PJ Media said it reported the film to the FBI and Department of Justice for child pornography. The FBI told Fox News, “Per DOJ policy, the FBI neither confirms nor denies the existence of an investigation.”

The film remains on Netflix’s site and a rep for the streaming service did not return Fox News’ request for comment. It was not immediately clear what Netflix’s vetting policy is for films.

I’m really hoping pedophilia is the hill that the rest of the country decides to defend and die on.  This shit cannot stand.  It needs to be pushed back against hard and swiftly.  Our freedoms are continually being attacked and cannot be taken for granted.  They will not stop.  If you have a Netflix account cancel your subscription and tell them why.  If you have their stock, sell it (or short it).  They need to be hit hard where it counts.

Is Beauty Objective?

In short, yes.  But, once you get beyond that there is a subjective side as well.  Great vid here by The Golden One about this down below.  But in short, this BS about how everything is up for interpretation is garbage.  Aesthetics are important.  And whether we’re talking about people, art, architecture, music, or anything else, you know deep down whether something is beautiful or not.  This post-modernist drivel they try and jam down our throats is garbage.  And you feel it, and know it instinctively.  The same goes for “art games” in the video game world.  Here is a great essay by Alex Kierkegaard on this very topic.

There is a concerted effort to make things ugly.  It sounds silly and stupid, but it’s true.  And they want to normalize ugliness and make you think that everything is subjective and up for interpretation.  Don’t buy into that crap.  There is objective truth, and objective beauty, in the world.