Good start to the long weekend

 

It is too easy these days to fall into a demoralizing spiral with all the news we read about each day.  Heading into this Memorial Day weekend we’ve had a few salient pieces of good news to talk about too.  The Storm is approaching.

President Trump has given Attorney General Barr authority to declass the documents related to campaign surveillance.

President Trump on Thursday night issued a memo giving Attorney General William Barr the authority to declassify any documents related to surveillance of the Trump campaign in 2016.

Trump also ordered the intelligence community to cooperate with Barr. The memo read: “The heads of elements of the intelligence community… and the heads of each department or agency that includes an element of the intelligence community shall promptly provide such assistance and information as the Attorney General may request in connection with that review.”

“Today, at the request and recommendation of the Attorney General of the United States, President Donald J. Trump directed the intelligence community to quickly and fully cooperate with the Attorney General’s investigation into surveillance activities during the 2016 Presidential election,” White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement.

Knowing what we know about these swamp creatures and the NPCs who support these swamp creatures it won’t turn everyone against them, but it’s the start that is needed.  Closer-to-center democrats and anyone with a shred of morality or honesty will see that despite whatever they think of President Trump, the abuse of power to try and remove him in an obvious coup attempt goes far beyond anything attempted before in our history and people need to pay.  And hearing President Trump essentially call out Comey, McCabe, and others higher up as traitors, with the penalty of death as a very real possibility, gives some hope that those responsible will not just skate away freely like they assumed they would.

The second huge news story of the day is Theresa May is stepping down as Prime Minister in Britain.

Prime Minister Theresa May announced her resignation from outside 10 Downing Street Friday morning, stating she would be officially stepping down in two weeks time.

In her remarks outside the Prime Minister’s official residence, Theresa May said she had “done her best”, and “everything I can” to deliver Brexit by negotiating a deal with the European Union, but conceded “sadly I was not able to do so”.

Saying it was time for a new Prime Minister to lead Brexit, Mrs May said she would be resigning as leader of the Conservative Party on Friday 7th of June, so that a successor could be chosen.

The pendulum is swinging back toward nationalism.  It has been YEARS since Britain voted to leave the EU and they still haven’t left yet.  The European Union, essentially a 2nd attempt to do what the Soviet Union could not, is falling apart.  And it can’t die soon enough in my opinion.  Its attempt to wreck the nations of Europe has damaged them greatly but many are waking up and pushing back before it is too late.  It’s funny to think a lot of people think America has been better off than Europe in this regard when in reality the exact opposite is true.  America in its current demographic form will not survive.  The European nations still have a chance to stop the inflow before it is too late and preserve their nations.  May stepping down is a huge first step.  Farage’s Brexit Party is surging.  Even Britain remainers see that the vote was made, Brexit won, and they HAVE to leave.  Britain will not go the way of other European nations who were forced to keep voting until the EU got the result that they wanted.  Funny vid below explaining the frustration of Brexit.

We have a lot to be hopeful about.  Evil will not prevail.  Demoralization and wizardry are all they have to defeat us.  What is hardly ever said is we are still the majority and we really do have the power.  Our right to bear arms, and the fact that over 100 million Americans own firearms is one of the reasons we still have control.  Let us not forget that.

And let us not forget that the freedoms afforded to this country are only made possible by those men who have died fighting for them.  In an ever increasing world of comfort, entertainment, and accessibility to whatever people want whenever they want it, and especially in a country becoming increasingly diverse and disjointed, you will see fewer people willing to put their life on the line to fight and die for these freedoms.  Let us not take for granted the ultimate sacrifice these men have made, and let us not waste what they have done because of cowardice, or comfort, or because it’s the easier thing to do.

The Fate of Empires

Sir John Glubb’s The Fate of Empires and Search for Survival is an essay well worth reading.  It can be found in its entirety here.  Empires rise and fall.  It appears that we are in the early stages of the downfall period of America’s current reign.  One does not choose which time period they are a part of but that doesn’t mean we cannot learn, prepare, and still thrive even during a downfall.  There is always a place for optimism.  And that is yet another one of Christianity’s great gifts; it always provides hope.

I Learning from history
‘The only thing we learn from history,’ it has been said, ‘is that men never learn from history’, a sweeping generalisation perhaps, but one which the chaos in the world today goes far to confirm. What then can be the reason why, in a society which claims to probe every problem, the bases of history are still so completely unknown?

Several reasons for the futility of our historical studies may be suggested.

First, our historical work is limited to short periods—the history of our own country, or that of some past age which, for some reason, we hold in respect.

Second, even within these short periods, the slant we give to our narrative is governed by our own vanity rather than by objectivity. If we are considering the history of our own country, we write at length of the periods when our ancestors were prosperous and victorious, but we pass quickly over their shortcomings or their defeats. Our people are represented as patriotic heroes, their enemies as grasping imperialists, or subversive rebels. In other words, our national histories are propaganda, not well- balanced investigations.

Third, in the sphere of world history, we study certain short, usually unconnected, periods, which fashion at certain epochs has made popular.  Greece 500 years before Christ, and the Roman Republic and early Roman Empire are cases in point.  The intervals between the ‘great periods’ are neglected.  Recently Greece and Rome have become largely discredited, and history tends to become increasingly and parochial history of our own countries.

 

To derive any useful instruction from history, it seems to me essential first of all to grasp the principle that history, to be meaningful, must be the history of the human race. For history is a continuous process, gradually developing, changing and turning back, but in general moving forward in a single mighty stream. Any useful lessons to be derived must be learned by the study of the whole flow of human development, not by the selection of short periods here and there in one country or another.

Every age and culture is derived from its predecessors, adds some contribution of its own, and passes it on to its successors. If we boycott various periods of history, the origins of the new cultures which succeeded them cannot be explained.

Physical science has expanded its knowledge by building on the work of its predecessors, and by making millions of careful experiments, the results of which are meticulously recorded. Such methods have not yet been employed in the study of world history. Our piecemeal historical work is still mainly dominated by emotion and prejudice.

II The lives of empires
If we desire to ascertain the laws which govern the rise and fall of empires, the obvious course is to investigate the imperial experiments recorded in history, and to endeavour to deduce from them any lessons which seem to be applicable to them all.

The word ‘empire’, by association with the British Empire, is visualised by some people as an organisation consisting of a home- country in Europe and ‘colonies’ in other continents. In this essay, the term ‘empire’ is used to signify a great power, often called today a superpower. Most of the empires in history have been large landblocks, almost without overseas possessions.

We possess a considerable amount of information on many empires recorded in history, and of their vicissitudes and the lengths of their lives, for example:

Empires.png

This list calls for certain comments.
(1) The present writer is exploring the facts, not trying to prove anything. The dates given are largely arbitrary. Empires do not usually begin or end on a certain date. There is normally a gradual period of expansion and then a period of decline. The resemblance in the duration of these great powers may be queried. Human affairs are subject to many chances, and it is not to be expected that they could be calculated with mathematical accuracy.

(2) Nevertheless, it is suggested that there is sufficient resemblance between the life periods of these different empires to justify further study.

(3) The division of Rome into two periods may be thought unwarranted. The first, or republican, period dates from the time when Rome became the mistress of Italy, and ends with the accession of Augustus. The imperial period extends from the accession of Augustus to the death of Marcus Aurelius. It is true that the empire survived nominally for more than a century after this date, but it did so in constant confusion, rebellions, civil wars and barbarian invasions.

(4) Not all empires endured for their full life- span. The Babylonian Empire of Nebucha- dnezzar, for example, was overthrown by Cyrus, after a life duration of only some seventy-four years.

(5) An interesting deduction from the figures seems to be that the duration of empires does not depend on the speed of travel or the nature of weapons. The Assyrians marched on foot and fought with spears and bow and arrows. The British used artillery, railways and ocean-going ships. Yet the two empires lasted for approximately the same periods.

There is a tendency nowadays to say that this is the jet-age, and consequently there is nothing for us to learn from past empires. Such an attitude seems to be erroneous.

(6) It is tempting to compare the lives of empires with those of human beings. We may choose a figure and say that the average life of a human being is seventy years. Not all human beings live exactly seventy years. Some die in infancy, others are killed in accidents in middle life, some survive to the age of eighty or ninety. Nevertheless, in spite of such exceptions, we are justified in saying that seventy years is a fair estimate of the average person’s expectation of life.

(7) We may perhaps at this stage be allowed to draw certain conclusions:

(a) In spite of the accidents of fortune, and the apparent circumstances of the human race at different epochs, the periods of duration of different empires at varied epochs show a remarkable similarity.

(b) Immense changes in the technology of transport or in methods of warfare do not seem to affect the life-expectation of an empire.

(c) The changes in the technology of trans- port and of war have, however, affected the shape of empires. The Assyrians, marching on foot, could only conquer their neigh- bours, who were accessible by land—the Medes, the Babylonians, the Persians and the Egyptians.

The British, making use of ocean-going ships, conquered many countries and sub- continents, which were accessible to them by water—North America, India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand—but they never succeeded in conquering their neighbours, France, Germany and Spain.

But, although the shapes of the Assyrian and the British Empires were entirely different, both lasted about the same length of time.

 

Assange Arrested

Julian Assange, one of the last true journalists left in the world, and probably the bravest given that he has literally risked his life to report the truth, was arrested in London after being kicked out of the Ecuadorian embassy.

WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange was arrested in London on Thursday morning, after Ecuadorian diplomatic officials invited British police into the country’s embassy to apprehend the Australian.

Assange had been living in the embassy of Ecuador in London under diplomatic asylum since 2012, and was granted citizenship by Ecuador in 2017.

Ruptly journalist Barnaby Nerberka has been broadcasting live from the embassy since tensions escalated between WikiLeaks and the Ecuadorian government of Lenin Moreno last week, and captured the arrest on camera.

Last week, WikiLeaks said sources within the Ecuadorian government told them that Assange was due to be expelled from the embassy “within hours to days,” an allegation the Ecuadorians were quick to deny. It now seems those reports were accurate.

WikiLeaks has maintained that Assange is likely to be extradited to the United States if expelled from the embassy, and was mocked as paranoid by some in the mainstream media for repeated claims that sealed charges existed in the U.S. against the journalist. WikiLeaks was eventually vindicated, as the existence of those sealed charges was revealed in November last year.

In June last year, Vice President Mike Pence pressured the Ecuadorian government on the status of Assange following demands from Senate Democrats that he do so. The New York Times reported in December that Ecuador has been offered debt relief by the U.S. in exchange for handing over Assange.

Assange was monumental in the email dumps that largely contributed to Hillary Clinton losing the 2016 election.  The DNC screamed and shouted that they were hacked.  The smart money is the DNC having had one of their own, Seth Rich, having leaked the emails instead.  He was murdered in an apparent robbery, though none of his possessions were actually taken.  Kinda strange for an alleged robbery, no?  And why else would WikiLeaks offer a reward for information?

Ecuador had every right to expel him from their embassy.  He had been there seven years.  But why now?  Q folks speculate his extradition to America is to really get his testimony into the official record.  Whether that’s true or not, time will tell.  But one thing is true, Julian Assange is a true journalist, who sought the truth and had the cajones to publish it, literally risking his life to do so.  Given that he had published information at one time or another that damaged both Democrats and Republicans he clearly wasn’t in it for political points from one side or the other.  How many journalists today take the hard road, the road that will pit you against the Clinton death machine?  A road that would keep you trapped in an embassy for seven years.  We shall see what happens to the man, but his contribution to preventing Clinton from taking office and the heinous crimes she and the Deep State committed against America cannot be understated.  None of what is going on right now, “the storm” that is brewing, would have been possible if she had won, and her odds of winning would have been much higher had Assange taken the easier road, one that nobody could really fault him for taking.

This is what your kids are learning in school

More indoctrination in the schools that I’m sure parents have zero idea about.  This is from the heart of the Western suicide movement, the UK.  In this episode, 6-year olds are being taught about gay marriage.  Here, the students are told they are Prince Henry, and they are to write a love letter to their servant, Thomas, about why it would be a “brilliant” idea for Thomas to marry him.  Watch the video for yourself here.

gender1

Most people in this country are of the mindset that anyone can do whatever they want that makes them happy so long as it’s not impinging on the happiness or freedoms of anyone else.  “Do not do to others what you wouldn’t want done to you” is something most people can agree with.  That said, I think most reasonable people would ALSO agree that it’s probably not healthy or normal or right to be indoctrinating kids in this way at such a young age when their minds are so malleable.  Make no mistake that’s what they are doing, indoctrinating these children.  I have no doubt the teacher thinks she is doing admirable, honorable work.  But the reality is what you’re doing is confusing children at a young age about what’s normal.  Yes, normal.  If they really wanted to teach inclusivity you could teach this story without forcing the child to assume the role of a homosexual.  You could just say “some people prefer people of the same sex” and leave it at that.  What they’re doing is deeper and darker.

gender2

If you don’t think they’re trying to indoctrinate the children read the screen captures posted from the video.  No boy or girl uniforms, again along the mindset of gender fluidity and “be whatever you want to be”.  All ages are forced to take part in these lessons.  I just have a hard time believing LGBT lessons are an essential part of a child’s curriculum at that juncture of their life.  Literally anything else from a classical education would be preferable to this.  Though something tells me these kids won’t be taught Shakespeare because he was part of the patriarchy or something.

If you’ve wondered why it feels like the times are more frenzied now, or that people are losing their minds, it’s because it’s true.  The communists took control of our education system a generation or two ago and we’re seeing the fruits of their labor.  College campuses were at the heart of all the social justice warrior nonsense that has sprung up.  It came to a head in 2014 and has only gotten worse now.  You think it’ll stop at LGBT?  Wait until they normalize pedophilia.  If you don’t think they’ll try and teach how it’s okay in some cases for a child to have a sexual relationship with an adult you haven’t been paying attention for the past few years.

 

The Perils of Pax Americana

Pax Americana, American Peace, was a term coined in the mold of Pax Romana and was the idea of civilizational peace amongst the more powerful nations under mostly American rule in the Western Hemisphere . The current Pax Americana is generally considered to have begun post World War II, where America was the dominant power that would act something like the world police. By and large it has worked somewhat okay, with major world wars being averted (so far) and “smaller” wars have been confined to mostly proxy wars with smaller main combatants.

But I don’t want to talk about the merits or follies of Pax Americana on the world stage. Instead, we look inward and ask how has this American peace molded society in America. Has this period of 70+ years of relative peace at least in America propelled America to ever greater heights? On the contrary, I think most people would agree America is not on an overall upward trajectory since World War II. Yes, President Trump is trying to turn that around, but there are many great dangers that continue to lurk and could continue the undoing of this great American civilization.

There are many aspects to Pax Americana that can be discussed, but today we mainly focus on how it has hurt the American people, and more specifically the American spirit. Too much of a “good” thing often ends up yielding terrible consequences. Much like a forest fire can sometimes be beneficial to clean out and make room for new growth, sometimes war or nefarious acts that directly affect us can have positive benefits. NN Taleb hammers this point home in his book Antifragile, and we see it everywhere in the natural world, especially in medicine and with our body. “That which does not kill us makes us stronger” as Nietzsche coined it. War, for all its downsides, does have many positive psychological effects as well. Usually it will unite a people. It puts into perspective what’s really important in life, and gives one more appreciation for what they have (or what they had before war) and for what’s worth preserving, fighting, and dying for. I propose that in our Pax Americana we’ve grown too soft, too comfortable, and taken our freedoms and liberties for granted for far too long. We’ve become complacent, presumptuous, forgetful, and misguided.

One of the main perils of a peace lasting too long is it’s easy to forget how and why we got there. The effect is even more pronounced when you have a failed educational system that often times barely addresses history, or changes it altogether. It is easy to take for granted one’s freedoms when it has been too long since they needed to be defended. One begins to think it is the natural order of things to be free, and consequently it becomes easy to take it for granted and assume it is easy to obtain. One could make an argument we’ve had plenty of wars since World War II that run counter to this. But the reality is all of these conflicts (save for 9/11) have been on foreign soil usually thousands of miles away. And in our modern economy we really do feel very little, if any, effect on our daily lives. If you didn’t take the time to watch the “news” you may have no idea at all that war is even going on. Contrast that to World Wars I and II, where citizens often had to ration food and fuel for the war effort. Factories were converted for military vehicles and weapons, new roles were created and women took over many duties usually saved for men. Curfews, bomb drills, and blackouts all serve as reminders on the home front that things are different, and it’s easier to appreciate what one had when it is in jeopardy. Tragedy and hardship unite people. Communities are strengthened when there is a need, and it fosters fellowship and camaraderie. These stresses to the system and daily life can have a very positive effect.  Again, I do not wish for these things, but they do give us a greater appreciation for what we have.  And unless we constantly educate and remind ourselves of what it “used to be like” during these difficult episodes, we’ll either forget them altogether or unfortunately only learn after another period of hardship.

USARationing

It’s hard to ignore the war when it hits you where you live.

Something else that comes out when there is lasting peace, at least in our civilization, is the focus turning to other social issues, often times with an over-emphasis. “Idle hands are the devil’s workshop” as the saying goes. So it is too in society. Could you imagine the current gender controversy going on during The Civil War or The Great War? You would be roundly (and rightly) completely ignored if you tried to spread the notion that there are 71 genders. The same goes with the transgender bathroom issue. Something tells me the 0.00001% of the population that is transgender wouldn’t have as much pull or have any sway towards changing legislation when hundreds of thousands or millions of people were dying yearly during a war. When there is peace, the minute comes to the forefront, and often times is overblown. And as the peace endures, it only gets worse. Again, we begin to forget why certain laws or practices were put into place in the first place, or the reasoning behind it. Today, we’ve gotten to a point where we can pervert the original intentions, as it was with fitness tests for women in the military, or the police force. Standards are changed, codes rewritten, to allow for greater openness and acceptance when the rules that were initially put in place had very rational reasons behind them.

The Immigration Act of 1965 is another example of irrational change because we forgot why it was there or undervalued its purpose. Pre-1965, America was a mostly homogeneous population, or largely consistent in its makeup since the country’s founding. It was never in doubt, never questioned. The benefits of a society of this sort were never fully appreciated or understood once the threat of war was lost. We assumed anyone could be an American, and that it wouldn’t have far reaching effects on our neighborhoods, educational system, or everyday lives. Like it or not, the majority, if not all wars, have started because of tribal differences. Whether they are racial, religious, or ideological, tribalism was at its root. Yet our hubris got the best of us and we somehow forgot this key fact. And once we opened the doors to anyone and everyone, we lost some of that unity and no longer is there a dominant population or religion to unite the people. One can harp on and on about how diversity is a strength, but the fact remains the less people have in common with each other the less likely they are to congregate or get along. Do you really think you have a better chance becoming friends with your neighbor if you speak English and they only speak Spanish or Arabic?

Approaching_Omaha

Would these men be proud of what our country has become?  What they fought and died for?

Which raises another point in that we’ve completely lost our sense of self. We no longer have the pride in being American that we once had, and in fact are often times made to feel guilty to have any pride in the first place. Further, we’ve lost our sense of unity. With the blatant disregard for our immigration laws, and the agenda of pushing multiculturalism, there is no longer a push towards integration when one becomes an American. Assimilation seems to be a thing of the past. And because of this, we are losing any sense of unity as an American people. Observe a crowd watching the World Cup, or how people identify when asked where they are from or what is their background. “I’m American” is hardly ever the first answer. “I’m Mexican” or insert-race-here-with-a-dash-and-American, Mexican-American, Italian-American, etc etc. Multiculturalism in general has destroyed communities and led to civil unrest. Because we no longer try to assimilate newcomers, we’ve become more tribal than ever. Identity politics became the de facto position since Obama came into office, dividing the country on racial and religious lines. The notion of bringing in unchecked numbers of outsiders from all over the world or not seriously policing our borders during a time of war would be ludicrous and absurd. In peacetime, it’s somehow thought to be okay, as if there would be no ripple effects or changes in the fabric of society as we know it.

It’s interesting to observe that this effect isn’t uniquely American, but seems to only affect countries living under this Pax Americana. We see a crisis of identity and deterioration of society and its values in the UK, Germany, France, and most of the Western world. Contrast this to Russia or Japan. They are still proud of their country and their people. They’ve by and large preserved their sense of self. Like us, they have black marks on their history as well, but they don’t let themselves drown in guilt and self-flagellation and are still proud of who they are. Perhaps the fact that World War II was fought with a very heavy cost on their own soil has served as a longer lasting reminder to their people.

So the question remains, are we better off for Pax Americana? In 2018 we are as divided as we have ever been perhaps since 1968 or the Civil War. I am in no way advocating for some kind of war just to refresh our society. Far from it. But if we are to sustain peace and survive as a country we cannot forget our past, the values we fight for, or how and why we arrived at where we are. I’m sure many of these social fights and stands people have made in this peacetime have been with the best of intentions. But there is definitely some iatrogenic effect at work here; we most certainly seem to be doing more harm than good by intervening at all in many of these arenas. The shock and outrage of a baker not wanting to bake a cake for a gay wedding would seem a bit more petty and inconsequential if we were fighting for our way of life though, wouldn’t it?

No, I do not think we are better off. It has torn up our society, completely changed the demographic landscape, and led to a loss of American pride, which cannot be understated. Looking outwards for a moment, America as World Police has hurt our standing both in our own eyes as well as that of the world. Inserting ourselves into unjust or unnecessary wars, or wars that just plain have nothing to do with us, have left many Americans jaded, feeling guilty, and ashamed of what their country is doing. I have no doubt this is another contributing factor into why we’ve opened our doors to everyone (aside from the nefarious objectives of others in power too). Guilt, or perceived guilt, is a powerful motivator. A Vietnam or Iraq War can completely change how a country’s people view themselves.

USMarineTankinBaghdad

Are we any better off for having been in the Iraq War?  Oh right, WMDs…

Pax Americana has hurt our standing on the world stage and had deleterious effects on society on the home front. Most Americans, neo-liberals and neo-conservatives aside, would be happy if the United States re-adopted our pre-World War I foreign policy of staying out of other people’s business. It may not completely solve the problem, but it would be a start. A smaller military and global presence would have obvious benefits to our budget, and put the onus on other nations depending on us (without paying their fair share) to take care of themselves. Having skin in the game is beneficial to everyone.

More PC BS out of England – 40 schools in England ban girls from wearing skirts to accommodate transgender students

The UK has gone full libtard on the transgender issue.  In a move that will benefit nobody, 40 schools in England have banned skirts so transgender folks feel more comfortable.  This is a month after another school in England suggested dudes wear skirts when it’s hot out.  Via RT:

According to the Sunday Times, schools are opting for gender-neutral uniforms to encompass transgender students, with others consulting on a ban.

Priory School, a secondary in Lewes, East Sussex enforced a ban on skirts and ordered girls to wear trousers instead in an effort to accommodate transgender pupils, after students had asked why girls and boys had to wear different clothes.

Headteacher Tony Smith said in September, “We have a small but increasing number of transgender students and therefore having the same uniform is important for them.”

The number of concessions made for various fringe groups over the years is truly astounding.  It’s yet another sign of decay and decadence during the great downfall of our civilization.

I think parent Diane Burdaky has it right, “If boys want to dress like girls and girls want to dress like boys that’s fine, but what’s wrong with girls dressing like girls?” – but then again common sense should not be taken for granted in the current year.

New report on why Britain’s Deradicalization Programs are failing

A recent study performed by the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) of Great Britain revealed that only 2 of Britain’s 33 deradicalization programs actually work.  The main takeaway from the article, not surprisingly to some of us, via Gatestone Institute:

The main reason for the failure of the other 31 programs, according to the Times‘ report on the study, is:

“…that facilitators were uncomfortable dealing with sensitive topics and would often refuse to engage if they were brought up. BIT found that teachers in particular were afraid to bring up matters of race and religion with their students without appearing discriminatory, often causing them to refuse to talk about these topics entirely.”

The two effective initiatives, according to the Times, were “one defying political correctness and tackling difficult issues head-on and the other directly addressing extremism in religious [Islamic] texts.”

For as long as I can remember we’ve been taught that “diversity is our strength”.  Yet I challenge you to name one instance, outside of perhaps athletics, where diversity is specifically a strength, an area where we’ve only exceeded from diversity (rather than just do something of equivalent value).  More often than not, it appears to be a glaring weakness.  Further down in the article:

In Britain, the majority (82%) of the 228 people in custody for terrorism-related offenses espouse Islamist extremism. In August 2017, the EU’s counter-terrorism coordinator, Gilles de Kerchove, said that the UK has more radicalized Muslims than any other European country. He added that Britain “has identified 20,000 to 35,000 radicals. Of these, 3,000 are worrying for MI5, and of those 500 are under constant and special attention.”

Contrary to what they’ll try and teach you these days, Islam is not native to Great Britain.  It’s not surprising to me in the least bit that the vast majority of terrorism related offenses are Islamic terrorism.  The fact that you even need deradicalization centers in your country should probably raise a red flag or two.  And again, it seems to me there is a much greater problem from diversity here than a strength.  And we are our own worst enemy with trying to fix it.  Fear of appearing racist or bigoted is hampering the only two known initiatives to beginning to address radicalization.  The ultimate answer, of course, would be to have stricter immigration laws from the beginning.  But that’d be too considerate to the native population.  Western civilization can survive with a plethora of ideas and beliefs for anyone to practice, but only within reason.  Mass replacement of the native population will inevitably end in bloodshed.

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